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Bury An Egg In Your Garden Soil, What Happens Few Days Later Will Surprise You


Good soil means everything for a gardener looking to raise healthy, happy plants. While, there are certainly countless chemicals and expensive solutions, there are actually many simple things you can do to boost nutrients and maintain a successful garden. Curious to learn more? In this video I’ll show you six ways to make any type of soil enriched with nutrients naturally, after which, you’ll never feel the need to buy those expensive chemical fertilizers. 1. Raw Egg. The solution for a thriving plant may be as simple as planting a raw egg As you prepare your pots with soil, simply include a single raw egg in the bottom. Over time the egg will decompose and works as a natural fertilizer for the seedlings. You can also use crushed eggshells which work just as good as whole egg. Eggshell has calcium, nitrogen, and phosphoric acid, which make them an ideal choice for garden use. So, next time you boil or fry an egg don’t throw away the egg shell, but instead recycle them to grow seedlings. When the seedling is ready to be planted outside, place the shell and seedling directly in the ground. The eggshell will decomposed over time and help fertilize the soil 2. Banana Skins Bananas contain a number of nutrients including: potassium phosphate, sulfur, calcium, magnesium, and sodium. All of these things can help promote healthy growing for plants. Best way to effectively use banana peel is to cut them up into small pieces so that they can decompose faster. This will result in organic matter that helps establish rich soil 3. Ash If you have a fireplace you’ll love this free method for raising pH levels. You simply scatter the ash around the soil as a way to lower acidic levels. This will make it easier to grow a fresh crop. 4. Leaves Allowing leaves to rot over a garden during winter will provide nutrients for the soil to prepare it for the next growing season. The leaves work to pull the organic matter back down into the soil making it dark and rich. 5. Epsom Salt Epsom salts are especially good for soil. Low pH levels are usually an indication of a magnesium imbalance. To boost pH levels in the soil dilute Epsom salt with water and spray on the plants. The vegetation will soak up the welcomed nutrients. 6. Compost Regularly While using bits and pieces of natural matter can be helpful, combining many pieces of compost will only go one step further toward enriching your soil. There are a number of benefits of using natural compost regularly. It works to improve the soil structure while using less water and warding off common plant diseases. The soil benefits from added layers of nutrients, especially before a growing season. Now if you liked the video, give it a thumbs up, and if this is your first time visiting my channel, please subscribe for more videos.

100 Comments

  1. Richard Williams Author

    I do the eggshellls but not much cause everyone else in my house fegets to save them for the garden the banana peel I just throw them in the ash I don’t use going to start now thou yea some leaf yes espsom salt most def I just throw in and when I am planting compost yes

    Reply
  2. Sailfire1 Author

    Foxes sometimes bury eggs as a food store to be dug up later. I don't think I would plant a seedling on top of a raw egg – it would stink. I put potato peelings, vegetable peelings and banana peel on my plant beds, along with ash from burnt brambles and branches. I let the leaves from trees rot down naturally. My soil does pretty well. A feral cat has made my compost bin her home, so I don't use it for composting now.

    Reply
  3. Andrew Zoledziewski Author

    Nitrogen is not good for tomatoes plants all u need is potassium nitrogen will make ur plants not produce do not overdue the potassium how do I know this I teach horticulture

    Reply
  4. TSiriusz Author

    The rusted garden did this, and i can testify that it does indeed boost growth by a significant amount. But instead of using it for seedlings, you have to pre bury 1 whole smashed egg and 1 whole cut banana deep enough and have it sit there for a decent amount of time. another thing to do is to add coffee grounds right over the top and/or in the compost hole, so that you attract worms that will help breakdown the egg and banana faster.
    Seeds have much of the nutrients necessary already to grow into a smallish plant, so the fertilizer isn't needed immediately. Just let the seed sprout in potting soil and when its big enough to transplant it into the main garden, bury another egg and banana in the same spot where you buried it last time. Plant the seedling nearish to the fertilizer hole, and add some epsom salt on the surface to help with transplant shock. Water well, and let it sit (also add more coffee grounds). When the plants start flowering, add another egg and banana into the compost hole and bury it again and that should be most of the nutrients the plant needs for a whole season (Coupled with weekly fertilization of a 1-1-1 water soluble mixture).
    I can say with confidence, that the banana breaks down fast with the worms attracted to the area, and the only leftovers i can see are bits of egg shells from the smashed egg. Very fertile soil amended with homemade compost, and a core of straw buried in the middle to soak up excess moisture each watering cycle.

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  5. Rick Skeptical Author

    I doubt the egg thing has any short term effect. If not buried deep enough, it will stink as it rots. The calcium in the shell is not accessible until the shell degrades which will take a long time intact and buried, better breaking the shell up into "shell dust" and leaving it on top. The yolk and the white are basically animal tissue that will have to dry and rot before breaking down into something useful. Chopped up banana peel (the smaller the better) can provide benefits sooner.

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  6. Darscabins Author

    Takes a long time to decompose. Plant with already be dead and gone your stuck with an egg if you break it you’ll have to move. Lol

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  7. Ofon Author

    Yeah…what happens here in Houston is that you find your plant dug up the next day by an opossum or raccoon and your plant is dead. No thanks.

    Reply
  8. Tsk Jafri Author

    Guys, if you have a DrumStick tree cool. If not, better grow one. If there are dry leaves of it, just sprinkle near the plant and there will be no bugs. If you cut it as it would grow too high instead of like a bush, just bury the stick (Fresh it must be) in the plant's soil and it will thrive (again no bugs). Use it's leaves which are on tree (Very Fresh) in your vegetables for they are very healthy. Thanks for reading…

    Reply
  9. Joe Wolf Author

    I buried an egg in my garden soil, what happened in few days was very surprising. Few days after I buried the egg, my boss gave me a promotion and a great raise. 😝

    Reply
  10. eogg25 Author

    I had some Chicken feathers and I gave one to my kid who was preschool age and told him to plant it in the back yard and grow a chicken. He did it but nothing grew. He was really disappointed. maybe I should have told him to plant an egg.

    Reply
  11. Joshua Zieba Author

    I just did an experiment with an egg under tomato plants on Joshua Zieba channel and you can see a dramatic difference three weeks in compared to ones that got no egg!

    Reply
  12. Jim McCarley Author

    I always liked to bury an egg with my seedlings and also always threw the banana peels into the garden. I never realized cutting them up would help. As most gardners know who are serious about growing nice gardens you need to know what your soil may need and so when starting a new garden plot a soil sample test is good. I tried to always improve the soil and if consistent you can. I wish I was able to still live in the country and work in the garden but with my health I can no longer do that. I CAN watch great videos and enjoy learning new tricks. Thank you so much for this video

    Reply
  13. Deputy Van Halen Author

    Ok what the helllllll!!!
    I mowed my lawn yesterday and found an birds egg…a small one. I left my phone inside. A few hours later I told my mother I found an egg and today I see this on my YouTube.
    I told my mother not in English. It was a foreign local dialect also!?!!!!??!!

    Reply
  14. ps37see10and29 Author

    A seedling's roots will NOT be able to break through an eggshell , you'll lose your plant . Crushed eggshells are great ,just don't try planting a seedling inthe cute little eggshell.

    Reply
  15. Sunil Nair Author

    Imagine burning an egg in India. ROFLMAO

    Next thing you will know your neighbour is attacking you. And they are blabbering about black magic shit. ROFLMAO

    Do you want me to get lynched by crazy shit ass people? ROFLMAO

    Reply
  16. Steven L. Cranford Author

    Based on my personal experience, whole egg shells decompose v-e-r-y slowly. I have dug up intact eggshells, showing no sign of decomposition up to 2 years later. Crushed eggshell seems to work better, or at least the pieces are not as readily apparent when digging in the soil later. I have never tried using eggshells as a seed starter, but given my limited experience with whole egg shells must ask 1. how the plant gets or drains water thru an impermiable eggshell. and 2. will the seedlings roots be strong enough to break open an eggshell which is surrounded by soil (assuming you planted the seedling in the eggshell as shown in the video).

    Banana peels, leaves and to a limited degree ash and used coffee grounds have been useful in my gardening efforts, but personally only recommend using fully crushed eggshells.

    Reply

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