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FAMOUS GRAVE TOUR – Forest Lawn Hollywood #4 (Carrie Fisher, Debbie Reynolds, etc.)


Welcome to Hollywood Graveyard where we set out to remember and celebrate the lives of those who lived to entertain us, by
visiting their final resting places. Today we’re heading back to Forest Lawn
Memorial Park in the Hollywood Hills, to visit such stars as Carrie Fisher, Debbie
Reynolds, Bill Paxton, and many more. Join us, won’t you? Earlier this year we toured Forest Lawn
Memorial Park in the Hollywood Hills. Today we’re heading back there to visit
some stars that we missed the first time around, and to pay our respects to a few
that we’ve lost since. if you haven’t done so already, be sure to check out our
original three-part tour of Forest Lawn Hollywood. We’ll begin our tour back at the Courts of Remembrance, east of the entrance. Heading into the first courtyard we make our way to the Columbarium of
Remembrance on the right. On the left wall, above eye-level, is the niche of
actress Harriet MacGibbon. She is best remembered for her role as Mrs. Drysdale
in the popular 60s TV series, “The Beverly Hillbillies.” Across the sidewalk is the
other Columbarium of Remembrance… Hold it… Look at the size of that thing! It flew right into me. Don’t worry though
I didn’t get stung, nor did I drop the camera I’m proud to say. On the right wall above eye level is Orry-Kelly. He was one of Hollywood’s legendary
costume designers. Kelly was born in Australia and made his way to Hollywood
in 1932. He designed costumes for some of Hollywood’s most legendary films,
dressing stars from Ingrid Bergman in “Casablanca,” to Jack Lemmon and Tony
Curtis in “Some Like it Hot.” He won three Oscars in his career. His memoir, Women I’ve Undressed, was published in 2015. Let’s continue into the courtyards past
the second, into the third, then turn right into the southeast most courtyard.
On the southern wall we find the tomb of mother and daughter, Debbie Reynolds and Carrie Fisher, two of Hollywood’s most beloved actresses, who tragically died
only one day apart. Debbie Reynolds was crowned Miss Burbank
in 1948, several movie studios immediately vying to sign the budding
starlet, who showed great aptitude for song and dance. Her breakout role was in
the 1952 film “Singin’ in the Rain.” [music] Her starring role in “The Unsinkable
Molly Brown” garnered her an Oscar nomination, and in 1973 she lent her
voice to “Charlotte’s Web” in the role of Charlotte. Debbie was also a passionate
film historian, amassing an impressive collection of movie memorabilia over the
years. She was married to singer Eddie Fisher, their daughter was actress Carrie
Fisher, entombed here with her mother. Carrie Fisher, she was our princess, loved by millions the world over for her role as Leia in
the Star Wars series of films. “Aren’t you a little short for a stormtrooper.” “Well I guess you don’t know everything
about women yet.” “I love you.” “I know.” She was no damsel in distress or a
shrinking violet – her Princess Leia was strong, feisty, intelligent, and stood her own with the boys. Carrie was a fighter off
screen as well as on, open about her struggles with drug addiction and
bipolar disorder. In the years that followed the Star Wars films she acted
in various comedies and wrote several books, including Postcards From the Edge. In 2015 she returned to the role that made her famous, playing General Leia
Organa in “Star Wars: The Force Awakens.” “May the force be with you.” Later this year audiences will get to see her play the iconic role one last time, in her
final film, “The Last Jedi.” Carrie died days after suffering a heart attack aboard a plane from London to LA. Debbie was devastated by her death reportedly saying, “I want to be with Carrie,” shortly before she died. They had a shared funeral On January 6th 2017. A humorist to the end, a portion of Carrie’s cremated remains were placed in a Prozac-shaped urn
before entombment. Shortly before their deaths a documentary was produced about
the duo, titled “Bright Lights.” Heading back into the courtyard north
let’s stop off at the Columbarium of Providence to pay a quick revisit to
actor Josh Ryan Evans. We visited Josh in part one of our tour, but his marker was
missing. It has since been replaced. For a full profile of Josh
check out part 1. Continuing north in this courtyard we reach a wall of niches on the left. Near the right side, about at eye level, is Richard Farnsworth.
He started his career as a stunt man before moving into acting. He won an
Oscar for his role in “The Straight Story,” and played Sheriff Buster in Stephen
King’s “Misery.” Let’s head back to the second courtyard. Turning right we
reach the Columbarium of the Radiant Dawn. On the far wall, just above
eye-level, is Donald Mills. He was one of four brothers known as the Mills
Brothers, originally known as the Four Kings of Harmony. They were a jazz and
pop vocal group who entertained audiences for over a half-century. Donald
was the lead tenor. They made their on-screen debut in the 1932 animated
hybrid short film, I Ain’t Got Nobody.” Just outside the Columbarium, on the
right wall, is Nudie Cohn. He was a designer of western apparel, particularly rhinestone covered suits, known as nudie suits. He designed suits for some of the biggest stars of the late 40s through
the 70s, including Roy Rogers, Hank Williams, Elvis Presley Gene Autry and more. He’s entombed with his wife, Bobbie, the
original rhinestone cowgirl. Let’s head to the Courtyard straight south. On the left wall, just past the stairs, we find another of the Mills Brothers, Harry
Mills. Harry was the baritone of the Mills Brothers, who sold over 50 million
albums in their career. They were inducted into the vocal group Hall of Fame in 1998, and were influential on many artists, including Dean Martin. [music] That’ll do it for
the Courts of Remembrance, let’s make our way over to the Courts of Liberty in the
southern portion of the cemetery. Heading past the Washington Monument toward the mural, up several tiers on the left, is the unmarked grave of actor Bill Paxton,
who appeared in some of the greatest films of the past three decades. Some of
his earlier roles were in films like “Weird Science,” and “Aliens,” In the 90s he had prominent roles in “Tombstone,” “Apollo 13,” and “Titanic,” one of the
highest-grossing films of all time. “Okay quiet, we’re rolling… Seeing her coming out of the darkness like a ghost ship still gets me
every time. To see the sad ruin of the great ship
sitting here where she landed at 2:30 in the morning of April 15th 1912, after her
long fall from the world above.” He died far too soon after complications
from heart surgery. Let’s stop off real quick and pay a revisit to comedian
Steve Allen, just northwest from here. We visited him in part two of our tour, but
as his grave was unmarked, we pointed the camera at the wrong spot. Here he is in
lot 1725, north of the sidewalk. For a full profile on Steve Allen, check out
part 2. For our last stop we’ll head back toward
the entrance, to the Sheltering Hills section. We turn left to the four-way
stop and head a short way up the hill. In on the right, at the base of the tree,
it’s Hollywood’s first Indian star, Sabu. He was born in India and became a US
citizen in 1944. He was one of the most successful and respected actors of the
40s and 50s, rare in an era when most Asian
characters were played by white actors. He was the first actor to play Mowgli in
1942’s “Jungle Book,” but his best-known role is
as Abu in the 1940 film “The Thief of Bagdad.” “What’s that?” “Oh Great and merciful master.” “Say that again.’ “Oh great and merciful master, let me out and I will grant you three wishes.” “Three wishes?” “Your first three wishes shall come true.” “You swear?” “I swear.” “By King Solomon, master of all the Gin?” “By King Solomon, master of all the Gin, and oath that no spirit can break.” “And you’ll behave? No threatening on shouting?” “No.” “No, what?” “No, master.” “Now, don’t make so much noise again, you frightened me before.” He died suddenly of a heart attack at
just 39. His daughter, Jasmine, who was an animal trainer on films like “The
Godfather,” is buried next to him. And that concludes our tour! What are some of your
favorite memories of the stars we visited today? Share them in the comments below, and be sure to like share and subscribe for more famous grave tours. Thanks for watching, we’ll see you on the next one! You remember these guys? Yep, they’re still here, up to their old shenanigans… eating everyone’s flowers.

100 Comments

  1. Hollywood Graveyard Author

    Re-uploaded with a small fix. Thanks to Film Fella Daniels, and the rest of you out there, for keeping me honest! You guys are the best. I wish YouTube would let me keep the comments when I re-upload a video, but sadly they all get deleted 🙁

    Reply
  2. kevin thatcher Author

    Bill paxton, the only actor to be killed by the terminator, alien and predator, he also sunk on the titanic, got stuck in space and got sucked up by a twister. Rip a great actor.

    Reply
  3. Pamela Linton Author

    You would think Bill Paxton and I forget the other gentleman's name, someone in their family would put down a headstone for them. I know its not been long since Bill, died.

    Reply
  4. colinatorak Author

    I always love watching your videos and your the only channel I am subscribed to. If you ever decide to come back to this cemetery, you should look up Ralph Bellamy, who was Randolph Duke in Trading places. I read he is also buried there

    Reply
  5. Tammy Evans Author

    I wish you would have shown my great uncle Glenn Strange. He was Sam the bartender on Gunsmoke. He is at Forest Lawn but I’ve never seen his grave. He was also Frankenstein in Abbot and Costello meet Frankenstein. If you do another tour, I’d like to see him included!

    Reply
  6. Bill j Author

    I can hear the Steve Allen monologue up in heaven now…" some fella down in Forest Lawn with a camera, shootin' my clump of grass for a video. It can only happen to me…he's shootin' the wrong clump."

    Reply
  7. TheMischief9 Author

    I had the biggest crush on Debbie Reynolds , Eddie Fisher was a fool to dump Debbie for Liz Taylor …. my favorite film of Debbie was " How the west was won" R.I.P. Debbie

    Reply
  8. Leon Sparrow Author

    Have been bed-ridden recently and stumbled across your brilliant tours. Really impressed by the way you balance the major stars with some of the fascinating 'now no longer so well known' contributors to the art form. Also super-impressed by your tact and sensitivity and your refusal to wallow in sensationalism and 'closet outing'. As a gay man I appreciate the fact that if you mention sexuality it is because it is germane to the narrative and clarifies, rather than judges. Your narratives celebrate diversity and achievement, and remind us all the ephemeral nature of life and the inevitability of loss.

    Reply
  9. Allison Alberici Author

    Debbie Reynolds was in Halloween town Disney movie all of them too,
    Do you believe haunted places and abandoned places.?
    Tombs and Caskets are not real and I am critic from that, from
    shape and size. Do you believe in Ghosts?

    Reply
  10. Laura Jones Author

    Carrie Fisher and Debbie Reynolds past away after my grandad he went on 12th December 2016 I love Bill Paxton in Weird science. Titanic and Thunderbirds

    Reply
  11. christschool Author

    Bill Paxton was one of my favorite actors. Fans should get together and buy him a marker. His epitaph could read "Game Over Man!" I bet he'd love that.

    Reply
  12. oceania68 Author

    since it is now March 2019, Does Bill Paxton have his plaque in place or is it left unmarked purposely? Same goes for all the other unmarked graves, it is astonishing for a known celebrity to have unmarked grave unless it was their wish.

    Reply
  13. Cecelia Tkach Author

    It's great to hear all the videos, some I didn't know existed but so happy to hear and see.

    Additionally I am so happy to see you are also letting us see the people who helped make these actors and singers famous, i.e. dressmakers, song composers, filemakers, make up, etc.

    Reply
  14. Jay Rogers Author

    I think it'd be cool if we invented a death simulator , so we could see what happens when we die, but theyd be able to revive us. I think it'd put a lot of people at ease. I'd love to know how and when I'd die

    Reply
  15. LiveLikeYouFly Author

    #1. Why are there so many unmarked graves? #2. Bill Paxton is one of my absolute favorite people. Why is his grave unmarked? It offends me terribly.

    Reply
  16. mad hatter Author

    Arthur, yours videos are so incredible. We get to visit the graves of our favorite stars without leaving our homes. Also, it is an A wsome film history.

    Reply
  17. Jon Stefanik Author

    I have seen the grave of actor Nicholas Colasanto, best known as Coach in the TV Show Cheers. He is buried in St. Ann's Cemetery in Cranston, RI.

    Reply
  18. Bruce Hubbard Author

    I saw Carry Fisher at Chicago wizard con in Aug. She signed a original story board of her in the falcon saving Luke from hanging on a antenna. On the story board was two spots for someone to sign, So i asked her for you want to sign the top or bottom part cause Mark will sign the other space. She looked and said" fuck it I'll be on top" and signed it. She was so funny and loved to autograph the piece. 2 months later she past away, I felt so bad, but glad I got to meet her.

    Reply
  19. w harrington Author

    When Carrie died I told my mom Debbie wouldn't be too far behind her. Not long after the news announced Debbie was in the hospital. A few hours later she was gone.

    Reply
  20. Rima Man Author

    6.21 back in those days they had no idea about music why make depressing songs why wine like a bitch one singer wineing is bad enough nobody and i meen nobody listens to the utter crap , theres 7 billion people in the world and theres probably only 140 people that listen to this kind of sound thats nobody , the old days were shit thats why a whole lot of changes were made a bit at a time, theres no such thing as the good ole days the good ole days of the plague, the good ole days or the depresion the good ole days of world war 1 and 2 the good ole days of strict cunts beating everyone in the family over the good ole days of walking 10 miles to school the good ole days of no cures, the good old days of abusive teachers the good ole days of slavery everything sucked so of course the music would of sucked too

    Reply
  21. Darrin Nunyah Author

    Am I the only one who is still profoundly saddenned by the way Fischer died? She never seemed to find happiness. Its even more saddening that her death grieved her mother to death the very next day. I can only hope she's at peace in the afterlife; whatever that means….

    Reply
  22. Darrin Nunyah Author

    I really like how you also cover off-camera talent too. It's great to learn about directors, stunt persons, wardtobe, etc. They may not be as prominent but are no less important to good cinema.

    Reply

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