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How to Build a Worm Tower


Here’s a worm tower, and
it’s a vertical worm farm. Just a big pot going down into the garden, holes in the side, open to the bottom. The worms only live in organic matter, so they won’t go into the soil. These are compost worms, not earthworms, but the byproduct is these have great fertilizing qualities for the garden, and create a compost and a worm juice that gives us free fertilizer. Fantastic convenience for a home garden or an urban garden, and here it’s a community
garden demonstration. With these compost worm towers, the miniature vertical
worm farm is in the garden. They don’t leave there, they
don’t go through the soil. They’re being well fed,
they stay right there where there’s high quality organic matter. And here, that the juices and the compost fertilize the garden in situation. You don’t have to separate your
worm farm from your garden. Great design.

30 Comments

  1. Memyself andi Author

    I live in the u.s. in the southern states and I want to do worm casting gardening and I'm going to do row crops how would I space them in a row crops

    Reply
  2. Nicolas Vanlangendonck Author

    Thank you very much! Why not make your compost directly on the soils of your vegetable garden? I you spread directly the organic stuff on the ground, is it less usefull? Thank you

    Reply
  3. TT KG Author

    Such a coo idea! But wont the worms produce too much juice and consequently burn the plants, legumes etc? And as the time passes by, wont the worm population increase too much ? Cheers

    Reply
  4. B uppy Author

    Use the black container and cut out thed bottom if you live in colder climes. The red wriggler worm needs warmth to do well in thed winter. This will help its survival.

    Reply
  5. omg hey there Author

    wow i like those massie wide vertical towers…i wonder what is the most narrow that a worm tube could be, in the event i have a narrower tower?

    Reply
  6. Water & Sky Author

    What's the purpose of drilling holes into the side of the tube when there is already a hole at the bottom as well?
    And is it perhaps possible to substitute worms with woodlice/isopods in the composting process?

    Reply
  7. CRUX9891 Author

    So cool, I have to build one myself. But how did worms get in there? Did you put them inside or were the living in the ground and were attracted by the food scraps?

    Reply
  8. Freyr SeaWolf Author

    I made 2 of these about 3 years ago . For a family of 3 I have a hard time keeping them full of scrapes . The worms love them .

    Reply
  9. Brett Kerr Author

    Wondering if you can put kitchen scraps like meat and pasta in there? Everyone says "kitchen scraps", but nothing specific. And clips always seem to only show fruit/veg scraps going in…. but never meat products.

    Reply

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