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How to Plant Heat Tolerant Greens – Fresh Salads Even in the Hot Summer! 🌿🌞


hi everyone I’ve had so many people
email me and tell me that you can’t grow salad greens in the heat well I’m here
to tell you today yes you can stick around we’re gonna plant some together
today we’ve had triple digit temperatures here in Southern California
this week and you can see the garden behind me is covered with shade cloth to
protect the vegetables from the heat now in the heat of the summer lettuce
doesn’t do too well you can see here I’ve got some lettuce that is bolting
going to seed it’s gonna be bitter and not too good for eating any more however
there’s no reason why you can’t have those fresh tasty salads all summer long
the key is the variety of greens that you plant so today we’re gonna plant
some heat tolerant greens so you can have those fresh tasty salads well into
the summer and even into the fall now the key to growing your fresh tasty
salads in the summer is the variety of greens that you plant you have to pick
greens that are going to hold up to the summer heat ninety degrees Fahrenheit a
hundred degrees Fahrenheit and keep on going so that you always have some fresh
tasty greens to harvest these are the greens right here that are the heat
tolerant greens they’re quick and easy to grow we’re gonna mature in about six
weeks so it’s definitely not too late to get some started here now in the mid
season for a later in the summer harvest and even some fall harvest too now if
you’re like me at this point in their growing season your garden beds are full
so I’m gonna grow my heat tolerant greens right here in this container and
it’s really easy just to pop up a container to expand your growing space
so this is a smart pause big bag round raised bed it has about 13 square feet
of growing space gives me a lot of room to grow my heat tolerant greens and I do
want to thank smart pots for partnering with us on this video you guys know how
much I love growing in smart pots the fabric is breathable which really does
help keep the plants cooler in the hot summer and in plastic containers the
roots tend to get overly heated and stunted and the plants just don’t do as
well remember don’t cut corners when it comes
to your potting mix and you your garden soil you want a nice loose
fluffy potting mix I’m using good dirt here it’s full of good nutrients and
it’s really gonna get my plants off to a good start I’ve got my container here
filled with good dirt potting mix I’m just pre moistening it down before I get
my plants in and that really will help the plants retain water and get them off
to a really good start so mix it in and water it down now that I have my
container filled with soil I’m going to install my drip irrigation you really do
want a separate drip irrigation system for your containers because they do have
different watering needs than the rest of my garden and I’ve got videos on how
to install drip irrigation in containers so that you know exactly what to do now
that we have the irrigation in it’s time to get the plants in now this is where a
lot of people go wrong they don’t plant greens that will hold up to the heat so
to take the guesswork out of it I’ve made it really easy for you and created
a heat tolerant greens seed collection there’s five varieties in here that will
hold up well to the heat two varieties of kale a red Russian kale and a blue
Scotch curled kale kale is a tremendous superfood super tasty and really takes
the heat then we’re also gonna plant some chard where’s my chard here it is I
don’t know if you’ve ever have chard but we love it in smoothies and salads it’s
so so tasty and we’re also gonna plant a heat tolerant variety of spinach now
usually spinach is a cool weather vegetable but this New Zealand spinach
is very Hardy very heat tolerant and the great thing about it is a lot of these
not only are their heat tolerant but they’re also cold tolerant so you can
grow them all summer long and if you live in the right climate they’ll last
you all winter as well so let’s go ahead and pop some of this beautiful red
Russian kale right in the middle of our garden bed now I started these from seed
about four weeks ago but you can also plant see
directly in your containers or in your garden beds so these are in the little
smart pots transplant errs while they’ve been growing here and I’m just gonna
pull them out and just pop it right in the middle here you can see this soil
the good dirt soil is nice and loose it’s really easy just to set this plant
right down here in the middle now kale really does well in full Sun but you can
also plant it in partial Sun and it will it won’t grow quite as big but it’ll
still grow very nicely so let’s actually pop in this other one right over here so we’re just gonna
plant a nice little selection of kale in the middle I’m gonna grab some of the
blue curled Scotch kale which is such a pretty variety now a lot of people
aren’t big huge kale fans but it’s really tasty if you pair it with some
fruit once it gets ready to harvest you can destem the leaves make a nice
fresh tasty salad throw some apples in there there are some pears in there or
some berries there a nice fruity dressing on top and it is just super
tasty doesn’t that kale look absolutely beautiful
let’s go ahead and pop some chard in here as well and this is the eldorado
chard I just love how the stems look it is such a beautiful green and the great
thing about a lot of these greens is that once they kind of get a little
raggedy in the heat of the summer or in the cold of the winter you can cut them
off right here at the base and they will regrow so these seeds are a really good
investment and I am running a sale on my website right now 15% off all of my seed
collections with the code “midsummer” and the sale is gonna run through Monday
July 15th, 2019 now let’s pop in some of this New Zealand spinach you can see this is
a nice sturdy leaf and this spinach likes to kind of trail along your garden
beds so I’m actually gonna plant it back here along the edge so it can kind of
trail over the edges of the container now some people have trouble starting
New Zealand spinach from seed but what you can do is use a heat mat to
germinate it indoors to really get it growing fast now remember these are heat
tolerant greens that will stand up well to the hot temperatures of summer so
you’re still going to be able to grow those fresh tasty salad greens that you
crave they’re just gonna taste so so good and they’re gonna keep on truckin
in the heat well this is gonna be exciting I can’t wait to hear from you
guys in the comments how well your heat tolerant greens are growing and how
you’re enjoying your fresh tasty salads even during the summertime
remember it’s not too late to start planting you can pop seeds right in your
garden beds or get off to a quick start and start some seeds indoors and these
will be ready to plant outside about 2 to 3 weeks after starting seeds indoors
I do have some parents cause romaine lettuce also in my heat tolerant greens
collection if you are gonna grow lettuce in the summertime make sure it’s a heat
tolerant variety most varieties like the cooler weather but the Romain’s do
really well in temperatures up to about 80 degrees little tip here plant
yourself some romaine lettuce in a little container that way you can put it
in the shade when it gets over 80 degrees or you can even bring it indoors
to protect it from the hot Sun so I’m going to water my plants in I’ve got
some berm astera worm tea and some good dirt plant food here in my watering can
get them off to a good start look at those colors don’t they look
apps and beautiful thanks so much smart pots for
partnering with us on this video and thanks to good dirt for supplying the
soil remember the key to growing those fresh tasty salads even when it’s hot
out is to plant keep taller varieties so grab a heat tolerant green seed
collection on my website and comment below let me know how it’s going thanks
so much for watching

47 Comments

  1. CaliKim29 Garden & Home DIY Author

    MY BOOK: Organic Gardening for Everyone: Homegrown Vegetables Made Easy – Signed, personalized copies available at https://calikimgardenandhome.com/books/organic-gardening-for-everyone/.
    CaliKim Seed Collections and CaliKim Smart Pots: https://calikimgardenandhome.com
    Smart Pots containers (excluding CK Smart Pots): 10% off w/ code “calikim” at https://smartpots.com
    Good Dirt Potting Mix, Plant Food: 10% off w/ code “calikim10” at http://good-dirt.com., also available at many Target stores.
    Vermisterra Worm Castings, Worm Tea: 10% off w/ code “calikim” at https://vermisterra.com
    What heat tolerant greens are you growing? Thanks for watching!

    Reply
  2. Keesha Tabitha Author

    I've looked at your seed collections like 3 or 4 times contemplating buying some… This video sold me, lol. I'm totally going to give these a try! You're awesome! <3

    Reply
  3. Brett Aker Author

    Swiss chards and kales are the heat-tolerant champions of my Florida summer garden so far. Everglades cherry tomatoes, Okra and peppers are doing strong as well. Great video CaliKim, keep up the great work!

    Reply
  4. Ken Riccio poems Author

    Dear Kimmy, it might be over a hundred degrees in California, but it is you that is the hot one in California.. absolutely gorgeous. Thank you for this video as I have been thinking of planting romaine lettuce but I thought it was a little late in the season but you convinced me to grow. You are a breath of fresh air! Thank you for this very informative video. respectfully, Ken

    Reply
  5. Donna G Author

    I'm not growing heat tolerant greens. I don't have the space right now. All of my fabric pots are full. Sometime near the end of August, I'm probably going to plant some radishes and carrots. Carrots for sure. I still need to get radish seeds. My cucumber vines are going crazy. I still have not found anything to use as a trellis. However, I do plan on saving some of my sunflower stalks to use next year.

    Reply
  6. R H Author

    Love the guitar background!
    Mmm… kale and apples. Will have to try, thx for the idea!
    Chard are such pretty leaves; I have the red and pink, and I love picking for baby leaves.
    I was lucky to get ~80-85% germination of my new pkt of New Zealand spinach. Now they’re growing like crazy!
    Can’t remember…. are you growing watermelon this year?

    Reply
  7. SantaAnaRoadWildman Author

    Thanks Kim! We got to about 90 up here in the 831 today. I still have a packet of some collards from one of your collections. Collards are heat tolerant! 🙂

    Reply
  8. Classy Mom Author

    You can because that's what we do in the Caribbean and we don't have the four seasons, we have dry and wet season. We have lettuce all year long with succession planting.

    Reply
  9. ptreadway39 Author

    Hi Kim. Great video. I will be planting heat tolerant greens this weekend. I received my complimentary bag of good dirt potting mix, I will be so excited to plant. I have a fabric strawberry pot in a bright green color that I think will be perfect for some heat tolerant greens. I love your idea of planting the spinach in a smaller pot. I have a CaliKim smart pot that is begging to be planted. You always inspire me, that is why I am always looking forward to the next video. I so love my garden and it is always improving. I’m experiencing what is called a flare in the RA world and the pain and stiffness are sometimes overwhelming. But my garden beckons and by getting out there and moving i can beat it. Thanks again for all your videos and encouragement. I think I’ll order some seeds now while the sale is going on. ❤️🙏🏻

    Reply
  10. Gina Wonderwoman Author

    That bed looks amazing, you will have many healthy delicious meals from that! In one of your videos I learned that you can cut down kale after flowering, which I did, also to chard after flowering. And both now grow back, yayyy! Also my brussels sprouts are growing in the half-shade, but they take aaaages, so they'll be ready for harvest in the winter when one needs them most. 🙂 My next heat-tolerant greens will be chives and spinach.

    Reply
  11. Michele Paccione Author

    I love my kale. Another way to sweeten your salad is to make some fresh jam or fruit compote with your berries and mix a little with oil and vinegar for a salad dressing. Then you get fruit in every bite. 🙂

    Reply
  12. Debra Crocker Author

    Your captions are so funny, all wrong. I wish you’d turn it off. We have the option of turning it on using our equipment.

    Reply
  13. CustomGardenSolutions Author

    That's a great seat selection. What a great idea to make it easy for people to know what to grow in the heat.
    I'm a big fan of Malabar Spinach and the hea of the summer.

    Reply
  14. D Brown Author

    I just ordered the greens but im in the Dallas Texas area, so do I need to start the seeds indoors or can they be planted directly in the soil ?

    Reply
  15. TheASNCLUB Author

    Good morning, this my first year growing vegetables so I’m a rookie big time and so much info. I been watching your tip videos from compost to fertilizer etc. Your vids are great helpful and informative. As of right now I’m growing tomatoes 3 kinds, cucumbers, peas, beans, Swiss chard, and pumpkins.
    I’m trying not to panic over what is probably normal gardening issues. Just wanted to say hello and thank you.

    Reply
  16. L Author

    I am out of space at the moment, but I definitely want to try this with your seed selection! I had talked to a lady at the local nursery & she says it’s impossible here but I would still enjoy the challenge! Thank you for the great video!

    Reply
  17. Sean DePoppe Author

    As always looking great! Thanks for the tips. Im just north of you in LA and trying to figure out what & when to grow. I have always had a garden, but that was is Washington state… soo a bit different. Thanks.

    Reply
  18. JabuJabule Author

    Hi Kim, I need help! I'm trying to grow bok choy, but bugs keep eating it! I bought this spray to help protect it, but it didn't help much. Any ideas on what I should do? I'm afraid that it'll happen to my gorgeous tomato plants once they start growing fruit.

    Reply
  19. Shawn Crystal Brown Author

    Hi Kim!

    I have been growing the early curled Simpson lettuce, romaine lettuce, Swiss chard bright lights and beets. The Swiss chard don't seem to be getting much bigger since I transplanted them. I may just harvest them all and start over from scratch. These ones had a really rough start. I harvested all of my beet greens about a week ago cause the bulbs weren't getting any bigger. I resowed them directly and they are starting to peek out already.

    My obsession with gardening has taken over my entire deck. I barely have room to get through to tend to my garden. Lol. As soon as I'm done mixing the last of the soil I'm going to move my lettuce and beets and chard under the canopied section of my deck to make more room there. Lol.

    Reply
  20. Treavor Brill Author

    Great ideas! I’m a new gardener have a few items growing including Swiss chard. You are my go to videos thus far and learnt all I know from your videos. I’m sure I’m doing things as best I can but having tomato leaf curl atm. I’m a Canadian in ONTARIO and had a huge rain dump so hoping that’s all it is.
    TYVM for all your videos

    Reply
  21. Keiko Mushi Author

    Purslane is pretty good as well, doing well in even hot weather. It also has the added advantage of being a good ground cover, protecting the soil underneath. Alas, a lot of folks see it as a weed rather than understanding the traditional culinary uses of the plant.

    Reply
  22. Seedaholic Gardens Author

    hi Kimmy! Planting for fall Ijustthew in Paris Island cos ans radish going to replantmore kales adding the newzeaand, chard and carrots ty for keeping everyone motivated to grow!

    Reply
  23. alicia carvalho Author

    I've been seeing New Zealand spinach in my garden centre, and I was doing some research, and it seems really awesome, but it's also listed as an invasive species in North America. Is this a non-issue as long as you don't let it go to seed?

    Reply

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