26 Comments

  1. AJ PD

    My Question is what Chemical is needed. What Chemicals. Glues? Is any of these chemicals synthetic or are they natural compounds. The important question is are they biodegradable?

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  2. Peace Now

    A lot of chemicals being dumped, how can we claim its sustainable and how can it be superior to cotton, which doesn't have to go through this level of processing. I am sure its superior to other man made fabrics like nylon. Hope there is an eco-friendly way of doing it! Hempcrete rocks though!

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  3. Antje Cobbett

    so hemp clothes in Australia is FAR from a natural product. Can't these people do the job without the chemicals? This video demonstration is disgusting, but thanks for letting us know!

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  4. 404

    It is amazing how you can use this single plant to build an entire carbon-negative home. Insulation is better, hempcrete is better, and it all uses less carbon to produce/build.

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  5. Jamie Hamm

    Hey there, I went to visit your page and found it no longer to be active? Have you guys gone out of business? I would hate to learn this as we need more people in this industry, regardless of what country! All our synthetic products are just shameful given what mother nature can and does provide us!!!

    Reply
  6. Shrive

    the dying process looks a bit complicated, there are quite a few chemicals added, are they all synthetic or natural, anybody know what they are?
    The end product those looks workable. I'd like to have a mental representation of how much plants you need to process to make say a large gargbage bag.
    How tough do materials made out of hemp come out?
    it looks like a good building material, weird we humans haven't made much good use of it

    Reply
  7. 1973flh

    Thanks for posting this. I had no idea how a stock plant is turned into a fibre that is workable for material process. It would be great to see how the next step works, from fibre to material. Just doing quick math, this production equipment can make enough dollars for a crew of four, and the growing costs? It seems that the output per pound would be hard to turn a profit. Can you share any additional info? Thanks from Canada

    Reply

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