100 Comments

  1. stateniland Author

    can you give me advice on how not to OVER or UNDER water my tomato plants? I have 8 plants in a raised bed and also in pots around my home.. They always begin to grow the first month or so very healthy then they get leggy and sickly looking.. I do get tomatoes but not like I should be getting.. Thank you Joe

    Reply
  2. Brad Pounders Author

    Thank you so much much! This is one of the better videos on pruning and using the "Florida weave". Not sure why you've
    attracted so many trolls but keep on doing y'alls thing.

    Reply
  3. MichiganWildcat Author

    great information, think i'm going to try that string weave next season over my cages. One question I have is doesn't that black plastic stress out your plants? I tried that several years ago and almost burned up all my plants from the reflected heat.

    Reply
  4. Ronnie Holley Author

    Superior to all other growing media, promoting faster root development and higher yields use MasterGrow for plants.
    https://www.ebay.com/i/192559576217?rmvSB=true
    http://www.nolamushrooms.com/mastergrow-1.html

    Reply
  5. doctorcatsburger Author

    Well, I got some tomatoes, it's not easy in Central Florida. I love this video I still refer back to it all the time, So much info here.

    Reply
  6. Scott Reavis Author

    I am trying this for the first time this year without much luck. The plants slide across the wire and still need tied up. I’m probably doing something wrong but I’m going back to stakes next year

    Reply
  7. CM SHAZAM Author

    Great video. Thanks very much. If I may, you should put the products you suggest and plant varieties in the video description area, under the video.

    Reply
  8. jdgaff Author

    Great video, thanks! For one sizable garden I used to have, instead of running twine back and forth I used a run of field fencing clipped to T-posts about 5-6 feet apart. From there, you can train the plants into every two or three openings up the fence or use garbage bag ties, Miracle Gro garden string (the kind with the built-in cutter), etc. The ties/string can be reused for several years if you're a tightwad like me. Probably wouldn't scale well for a hundred acres worth but for a large garden used year after year, it sure saved a lot of time over the years.

    Reply
  9. netdoctor1 Author

    I've had a terrible time keeping my plants and stems off the ground.

    I pruned them to grow upward this year, and I've still been plagued with Septoria Leaf Spot, even to the point where I've reluctantly had to use a fungicide on them.

    I'll consider this methodology for next year.

    Thank you for sharing here!

    Reply
  10. Axel Axis Author

    Over two million views. I thought this was a tomato growing information channel.
    I guess if you put a pretty woman in the thumbnail and have her staking tomato plants every pervert out there will click on it.
    Love it.

    Reply
  11. jeffdustin Author

    Once I had a love and it was a gas
    Soon turned out had a heart of glass
    Seemed like the real thing, only to find
    Mucho mistrust, love's gone behind

    Reply
  12. helicart Author

    Tomatoes aren't staked primarily for better circulation; rather, it's
    – for encouraging more leaf growth on each plant = more photosynthesis = more glucose production = more fruit
    – for growing plants closer together, which gives higher fruit yields per sq. meter.
    – for keeping fruit and leaves off the ground to avoid disease.
    Disease can be reduced dramatically by drip irrigation, which keeps the leaves dry. Wet leaves are more prone to getting disease. The great majority of tomato farmers do drip irrigation, and grow in greenhouses because tomato plants are very vulnerable to storms, high winds, and frost.

    Reply
  13. Vitor Madeira Author

    Damn… I had to watch 5 times to this video… Something would not let me understand the precious suggestions.
    Something really beautiful.

    Congratulations. 😉

    Reply
  14. Christopher blackburn Author

    When I was younger a long time ago I seen a big pile of of very black soil I am not sure if it come from farmer or was dumped by the counsel. But the texture of the soil was good it was full tomatoes what a crop I reaped that year

    Reply
  15. Mr coz Author

    That was the extent of "Pruning "??? I knew about the suckers,,,,,,,,I thought you had a more indepth lesson on pruning,,,I make tomatoe cages from old concrete wire you can find them laying around any construction site,,,,,,ok what kind of tomato is determinte and which brand is not

    Reply
  16. BLITZBURGH BILLY Author

    WOW THAT (THUMBNAIL PHOTO)
    OF YOURZ HERE, REMINDZ 🤔 ME OF
    ME & MY GRANDPA IN 1966 WHEN
    I WAZ A 6yr. 0ld. LiL BOY……

    Reply
  17. Regina White Author

    This is my first year trying to grow anything. I have over 30 determinate plants ready for my raised bed. I have been researching the best method to stake them and I think this method is called the Florida Weave and it seems to be the easiest and cheapest way to stake my maters. I have built 3 raised beds 3 x 8'. I will put 7-8 tomatoes in the western 8' sides of each bed. I will tie all 7 or 8 together as you did. I'll also plant pole and bush beans in the beds. May fill a baby pool with drainage holes with potting soil and plant bush watermelon and birdhouse squash. Excellent, informative video. thank you. will subscribe…..

    Reply
  18. Tracy Stumpf Author

    Love to have a Partner like you to come complete 40 acre garden. Greenhouses on a grand scale . Mushrooms Fruit Nuts Truffles . 🙂

    Reply
  19. Jim McNeill Author

    Love the video. What is the purpose of the plastic under the plants? I have grown plants before and I like to use a hoe to kind of aerate the soil a few inches away from the plant's base. Thanks again for posting the video. It's been very helpful.

    Reply
  20. Kianna Author

    Thank you so much your video was very useful, I will be able to pass this onto my daughter. We are big tomato fans. My favorite part was about using the stake at the end for tieing off where the string can be adjusted for high winds if need be, what a great tip.

    Reply
  21. Nick Nash Author

    Its my second year growing tomatoes in the UK, this year i bought a polytunnel and have 6 tomato plants in that and another 5 in the greenhouse. We have had terrible weather for most of May & June, very few days with any sun whatsoever. Suprisingly the Greenhouse Tomatoes are all looking very healthy still but the Polytunnel ones really are looking bleak, leaves curling on most plants and very little overall growth or flowers.I think the mositure which polytunnels hold is not ideal for Tomato plants if you are unlucky and get long periods of bad weather.

    Reply
  22. A REDTAIL Author

    Question,? How do you control Those Green Tomato Horn Worms, That destroy your tomato plants every year etc. Thanks for sharing great Info etc.

    Reply
  23. Alejandra Fuentes Author

    Thank you so much! I did not tend to my garden well this year and had little idea how too! Thank you for this video! I will take these tips

    Reply
  24. Vlad The Impaler Țepeș III Author

    Using twine to support tomato plants like you did in the second half of the video makes no sense because you ran the line straight up one side of the row then down the other side of the row. This will help prevent the plants from falling forwards or backwards, but they will still be able to fall sideways. A better way to do it is to do the "florida weave", which is similar to your method except you weave the twine through the plants down the row then weave the opposite way when you come back down the row. This method allows for some sideways support. You just have to make sure your twine is tight the whole way though, which can be a challenge the first time you do it but you get better at it the more you do it.

    Reply
  25. Vlad The Impaler Țepeș III Author

    Using twine to support tomato plants like you did in the second half of the video makes no sense because you ran the line straight up one side of the row then down the other side of the row. This will help prevent the plants from falling forwards or backwards, but they will still be able to fall sideways. A better way to do it is to do the "florida weave", which is similar to your method except you weave the twine through the plants down the row then weave the opposite way when you come back down the row. This method allows for some sideways support. You just have to make sure your twine is tight the whole way though, which can be a challenge the first time you do it but you get better at it the more you do it.

    Reply
  26. Vlad The Impaler Țepeș III Author

    Using twine to support tomato plants like you did in the second half of the video makes no sense because you ran the line straight up one side of the row then down the other side of the row. This will help prevent the plants from falling forwards or backwards, but they will still be able to fall sideways. A better way to do it is to do the "florida weave", which is similar to your method except you weave the twine through the plants down the row then weave the opposite way when you come back down the row. This method allows for some sideways support. You just have to make sure your twine is tight the whole way though, which can be a challenge the first time you do it but you get better at it the more you do it.

    Reply
  27. Vlad The Impaler Țepeș III Author

    Using twine to support tomato plants like you did in the second half of the video makes no sense because you ran the line straight up one side of the row then down the other side of the row. This will help prevent the plants from falling forwards or backwards, but they will still be able to fall sideways. A better way to do it is to do the "florida weave", which is similar to your method except you weave the twine through the plants down the row then weave the opposite way when you come back down the row. This method allows for some sideways support. You just have to make sure your twine is tight the whole way though, which can be a challenge the first time you do it but you get better at it the more you do it.

    Reply
  28. Vlad The Impaler Țepeș III Author

    Using twine to support tomato plants like you did in the second half of the video makes no sense because you ran the line straight up one side of the row then down the other side of the row. This will help prevent the plants from falling forwards or backwards, but they will still be able to fall sideways. A better way to do it is to do the "florida weave", which is similar to your method except you weave the twine through the plants down the row then weave the opposite way when you come back down the row. This method allows for some sideways support. You just have to make sure your twine is tight the whole way though, which can be a challenge the first time you do it but you get better at it the more you do it.

    Reply

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