35 Comments

  1. Patrick Antony

    First off great video, I am actually building a similar kiln for my wife's pottery, thanks for the inspiration! One question, Are these pieces already Bisque fired or is this the only firing that you did?

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  2. World Theory

    Cool video, would have liked a few more words of explanation, just giving details on things as you see fit.

    I'm kinda browsing around, looking for videos on the subject of pottery, and the firing process. Thinking of making my own workspace, and tools. I'm also interested in a huge variety of things, like making a super efficient wood stove (think rocket stove meets kiln), and experimenting with mixing stone/earth based materials (cement, clay, and whatever interesting filler materials I like) together in unconventional ways to make an insulating and sturdy material. I some time like making art, but I'm leaning more towards 'engineering' or 'inventing' relatively low tech, but refined … things… Why am I saying all this stuff in a random comment? I don't know… Meh.

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  3. Mary Pead

    To Julia Fleming or others, why do you add the dog food to the kiln firing? I am very interested to know about this technique. Thanks

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  4. Cheldena Artwear

    Hello, Love your video and also where your pit is located, how creative! Did you fire your pc's first in a kiln, then glaze them, and then Raku them? Or did you do everything green fired? Also, how strong are they when done, like earthenware strength, or electric kiln strength? Thank you!

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  5. Purely Puckish

    What kind of clay did you use? What cone is it? How hot does the pit get? I'm very interested and building a pit myself. I really need to know the clay type though.

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  6. Selina VajHer

    thanks for the video. it looks easy and like something people can really do. what did you line the pit with, just things from the hardware store it looks like?

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  7. sorin990

    yeah cool.but did you just bouth a hamster sawdust? ….dan dude, u wasted a lot of cash for that, go to a wood worker,he will give it for nothing, or just for free if u sweep it for him … <_<

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  8. Robbie Spence

    short and succinct, thanks, and I guess the results were fully fired (past sintering point) – my sawdust firings never got to that temp, due I guess to lack of the insulation you get with the pit. 

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  9. Bill Hunter

    HI,
    Thanks for that great video. I've checked out a few videos on this subject but I have found yours to be clearer and easier followed, you gave me every I need to know in three and a half minutes when others used 4 or 5 videos and left me confused. I now feel much more confidant, thanks.

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  10. Rafał Sacha

    Thanks Simon, I think I'll use my bucket to build a pit ; ) Lining it with clay, that is. I built a small coal forge using this technique, so it might work, or I'll try your suggestion, and put some bricks in the fireplace in my back yard. Keep up the good work! 🙂

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  11. Simon Winder

    If you use a metal container it will just conduct the heat away and it will not get hot enough, and the fire will go out. Its important that it should be a hole lined with bricks. Refractory bricks are best because they are good insulators and will keep the heat in. Best of luck.

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  12. Rafał Sacha

    Simon, I've tried that method twice, on two small coil pots I've made. Didn't use a real pit to fire in, Just a small steel bucket. Both times the fire just died, and my pots fell apart when they contacted water (I know they wouldn't hold it, since they're porous), They seemed to be fired (light coloured) halfway, and the other half of walls (thickness-wise) was black. Any suggestions? I thought about making some holes in my bucket, I don't know.

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  13. jwf1

    Thank you so much for this video! I have copied this technique a few times now and had some fantastic results! 😀
    Although, some of my pots seem to disintegrate when I clean them with water because the clay is not fired properly in places. I was just wondering if you have experienced this and if you have any tips to prevent this? Perhaps a layer of wood/newspaper etc. at the bottom of the pit to give a larger burn towards the end of the firing? Or just thicker layer of sawdust?

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  14. GeneralWiskers

    great video, was wondering if you knew how hot this gets up too, i have some cone 04 clay and this looks like the easiest method of firing at home

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