30 Comments

  1. Joni Swindlehurst

    Thank you for this info! I use landscape fabric for….a screen around my pool fence! Lol! And I weave it in and out of my wrought iron France as a privacy screen for my neighbors! Works great and lasts about 10 years! Anyway , that’s what I use it for! 😀

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  2. Deb Kitt

    Like d your video. Some things to think about. I am thinking of using the fabric on a very steep slope that we have that is currently all heavy duty weeds. Would it help stabilize the soil on the slope?

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  3. Ringo J

    Thanks for the video. After nearly 60 years of living, I have found the American dream of a house with a white picket fence and nice yard has ultimately turned out to be a pain in the ass. The original home cost is one thing, but cost (in money and time) of its maintenance and upkeep is whole other horse. Weeds in flower beds is just one of the ongoing pains. For low-maintenance reasons, 10 years ago I put down weed block fabric in my flower beds with 3" of gravel on top. Starting at about year one I still had weeds around the parameter edges. At about year two, I began to get weeds growing in the gravel. By year three, a few tough weeds were growing up through the fabric and gravel. And by year four, the fabric was literally deteriorating in the Florida heat and weeds were growing at-will. I found that if I spot sprayed weed killer the chemicals leeched over and killed bushes and flowers; so I have been stuck with either hand pulling the weeds or having to remove all the rocks and replace the weed fabric to get another few years of low-weed-deterence… because I tell you there is no such thing as completely weed free. In another section of flowerbeds I tried the paper/cardboard and even used bed sheets which neither method was much better. Because of this weeds-in-the-flowerbed dilemma, I make it a point to look at what some other home owners are doing. The only weed-free solution that I see are homes were the owners decided to just forget any and all bushes/shrubs/flowers. Yes, I know, a plant-less home looks a bit drab in decor but they also still look neat and a lot more maintenance free. I assume those owners put down plastic or use a liberal amount of herbicides (which I'm not crazy about). So at my age the days of crawling around my flowerbeds in the heat and bugs pulling weeds is much less attractive. And I am sick of the idea of having to once again rip out my flowerbeds and throw more money down on the ground to fight the weeds. Lastly, I am still trying to come to grips with the idea of a home with no flowers or bushes… after all that is a part of the American dream. The only other solution I can conceive is using large clay pots… VERY COSTLY.

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  4. Michigan Garden Gal

    Love this video! 💕 thanks for the info. I switched over to using newspaper, but for the most part I do not use anything at all. I really stick to mulching!

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  5. Kathleen G. John

    I'm in the southern california area, orange county and I use a plastic ground cover. Will this also work with cardboard drainage. The issue is I keep getting ants from under the plastic not sure where there coming from actually eating my tomato roots. Any suggestions will help. Thank you

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  6. Dawn Welton

    Wow! I feel like I dodged a bullet, seeing your video! We just laid landscape fabric, in preparation for installation of a rock/succulent garden, over the weekend! It's gonna be torn out, and replaced with cardboard. Thank you so much!

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  7. Stanley Blazeraznik

    I dislike how the cover rises up and out of the bed. The little plastic hold down clips do little to keep it in place. I only recommend it under a thick layer of mulch. I have rubber mulch over mine. It works well enough.

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  8. B Mcginnis

    I use it because I don't have to to pull weeds every week. Without the fabric, it will get out of control very quickly and the weeds become very difficult to remove.

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  9. Basil Kiwan

    We moved into our current home 2 and 1/2 years ago and the previous owner put down this landscape fabric in the various beds. At first I thought “great,less weeding”, but I’ve grown to hate this stuff. It just smothers the soil under it, while the mulch breaks down on top of it, and it really is a nuisance as I do new plantings and landscape work. Now I just rip it out wherever I find it.

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  10. Pam Napier-Uhl

    Just used the cardboard method to create a large “new” bed. We used large boxes from kitchen cabinets and appliances (thank you Lowe’s!) Hopefully it will smother the grass and lead to a beautiful garden space!!

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  11. stephen john baldwin

    Thanks….I actually thought I had messed up by laying a metric tonne of new pea beach on top of my existing shingle patio….after weeding of course ….then I heard about this fabric….that I thought would be the real answer…….after seeing your vid. I will stick to my environment friendly weed killer spray.. ( vinager / salt and soap ).

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  12. reviewloop

    Jim, I recently rescued a dog, and she has dug a race track around the garden. What would you recommend I put down? Was thinking gravel. More grass is out, anyway. Thanks!

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  13. Penny Duncan

    Why this expert doesn’t have 500 k subscribers is a mystery! Definitely a go to resource. I was struggling with should I remove this fabric or not?… I made my decision based on this video information. Thanks once again.

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  14. Et Q

    If weeds can grow through concrete, they can certainly grow through weed fabric. Their purpose should be to separate dirt from gravel. That’s why I just installed it for my french drain to solve drainage issues. I did install it in one part of my front yard with mulch on top. This is to help with weed control even if it eventually fails. I can simply rip it all out and start over. Eventually, I will do all gravel. I don’t mind weeding. It’s less taxing than a lawn.

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